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Colorado Capitol Report

Colorado Supreme Court Rules that Colorado General Assembly Can Continue to Work Post-COVID-19 Pandemic


Colorado Supreme Court Rules that Colorado General Assembly Can Continue to Work Post-COVID-19 Pandemic

This week, the Colorado Supreme Court ruled in a narrow 4-3 decision, that during a declared public health emergency, the 120 days of a legislative session do not have to be counted consecutively. The regular legislative session is limited to 120 days, and the final day of Session would have been May 6th.  However, based on the current COVID-19 pandemic the Legislature recessed on March 14th. The General Assembly submitted briefs asking the Supreme Court if legislative days must be counted consecutively during a public health emergency, as determined by the Governor, or whether the General Assembly could suspend the Session and resume at a later date.

With this ruling, the General Assembly will be able to count only “working calendar days” toward the 120-day limit, based on this public health disaster emergency.  The Colorado General Assembly has worked 67 of the 120 days, thereby leaving 53 days remaining.  It’s unknown when legislators will return to the Capitol, and House and Senate leadership have stated that it will depend upon legal advice and the safety of legislators and the public.


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Creative and Effective Methods to Address COVID-19, with Questions Among Peers

The Colorado Chamber’s Dave Tabor, with co-host Helen Drexler, CEO of Delta Dental of Colorado held a successful virtual luncheon.  Among those attending, the session featured prepared input from Shawn Neville (Boa Technologies), Erin Neer (MUNIRevs, Durango), Sarah Schaeffner (Dependable Cleaners), Paul Raab (Linhart PR), Chris Schmachtenberger (Carestream Health), Steve & Allison Kinsley (Kinsley Meetings), Steve Swinney (Kodiak Building Partners), Arnaud Chabenat (Simon Contractors), Kendall Colman (Total Coaching Systems).

View the Virtual Luncheon.