Colorado Capitol Report

Family Medical Leave Bill Scheduled for Fourth Year in a Row


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Family Medical Leave Bill Scheduled for Fourth Year in a Row

A CACI-opposed bill (HB-1001, the “FAMLI Family Medical Leave Insurance Program)  that would create an employee-funded but state-administered paid medical-leave system is scheduled for its first hearing next week.  The co-sponsors of HB-1001 are Representatives Faith Winter (D-Westminster) and Matt Gray (D-Broomfield).

Hearing Details:

Location:             House Business Affairs and Labor Committee,

Room A of the Legislative Services Building

Date/Time:         Tuesday, February 6th  at 1:30 p.m.

NOTE CACI is asking employers to testify against the bill or contact Committee members to express opposition to the bill if one of the members is your representative.   For additional information please contact, Loren Furman at 303-888-9387 or at lfurman@cochamber.com.

BACKGROUND:

The CACI Labor and Employment Council, which has opposed similar bills in the prior three legislative sessions, voted to oppose HB-1001 when it met on January 24th.  The top concern for CACI is that such a bill, if it were to become law, would entail unreimbursed costs on employers to administer the program in the short run and, potentially, it could lead to a mandated universal system in the long run to which employers could be forced to contribute. Below is the bill’s legislative description:

The bill creates the family and medical leave insurance (FAMLI) program in the division of family and medical leave insurance (division) in the department of labor and employment to provide partial wage-replacement benefits to an eligible individual who takes leave from work to care for a new child or a family member with a serious health condition or who is unable to work due to the individual’s own serious health condition.

Each employee in the state will pay a premium determined by the director of the division by rule, which premium is based on a percentage of the employee’s yearly wages and must not initially exceed .99%. The premiums are deposited into the family and medical leave insurance fund from which family and medical leave benefits are paid to eligible individuals. The director may also impose a solvency surcharge by rule if determined necessary to ensure the soundness of the fund. The division is established as an enterprise, and premiums paid into the fund are not considered state revenues for purposes of the taxpayer’s bill of rights (TABOR).

Additional concerns include that the bill lacks long-term sustainability and predictability for employees who will be relying on the benefits that the program is intended to offer.  Additionally, if the fund cannot stay solvent, those employees would be subject to a “solvency surcharge” which would force them to pay more to continue the operation of the program.  The bill also requires employers to guarantee the same or equivalent position with equivalent benefits and pay for the employee when they return after 12 weeks, even if the worker had only been employed for 90 days.  Finally, the bill does not align with the current Federal Family Medical Leave Act which will create more complications for employers that are currently trying to comply with existing federal law.

The Fiscal Note on the bill has yet to be released, however, in previous bills, the fiscal note has stated that the program would cost $545 million and require approximately 223 state employees to administer.


Governor’s Director of State Planning & Budgeting Provides Outlook on State Budget & Impact of Federal Tax Reform

This week, the CACI Government Affairs Council had the opportunity to hear from Henry Sobanet, Director of the Office of State Planning and Budgeting for Governor Hickenlooper.  During his presentation to the Council members, he shared the Governor’s proposed budget for 2018-19 fiscal year, and the impact of the Federal Tax Reform on Colorado’s revenue estimates.  During the presentation, Henry discussed the potential new funding for transportation infrastructure as well as other state needs such as education, capitol construction, and Medicaid.

During the meeting, the Council members also heard from the CACI Lobby Team about our legislative agenda for the current year as well as an overview of specific labor and employment, healthcare and energy and environment legislation.  A list of the CACI Policy Council positions is provided here.

Upcoming Governmental Affairs Council Meeting Details:

Date: February 13, 2018
Time: noon-1:00
Location:  CACI Office, 1600 Broadway, Ste. 1000, Denver

The CACI Governmental Affairs Council is a forum for members to discuss bills pertinent to the current Colorado Legislative Session. Learn more about joining a CACI council.


Building Partnerships with CACI

Sheila Brown
Colorado Director of Human Resources, Jacobs Entertainment

Why did you begin attending the Labor & Employment Council at CACI?

The COO of our company introduced me to CACI and requested my participation as a way for our industry in Black Hawk to be informed about the legislative issues relative to employment concerns. We also saw this as a way to have input on decisions made at the legislative level.

What have you found/learned through your participation?

It has been eye-opening to understand how Bills are introduced and the reasons behind the bill proposals. Those of us around the table must passionately consider these proposed laws and strike a balance of determining how our businesses will be impacted while also weighing the positive or negative impact to employees we represent.

Have you built any new business relationships?

Yes. I have had the opportunity to form new relationships in which we tap on one another for guidance and advocacy for our respective businesses. Although many of the individuals I have met through CACI frequent The Lodge and Gilpin Casinos in Black Hawk, they never understood how regulated the gaming industry is and how the majority of our hourly employees are impacted by the labor laws that are brought forth in Colorado. CACI provides a very efficient way to give our industry even more exposure.

Does participation help you in your job? Will it help your business?

When it comes to labor laws, my participation on the Labor & Employment Council has given us insight into upcoming changes that we did not previously have. I can also go back to my colleagues and get their feedback and perspective on some of the proposed changes.

What should others know about participating in the Labor & Employment Council at CACI?

Having knowledge of the issues that impact our business, I feel that I can positively represent the entire casino industry in Black Hawk by having that seat at CACI’s table.


CACI-Supported Bill for Business Personal Property Tax Relief Dies in House “Kill Committee”

Yesterday, on a party-line, six-to-three vote, the House State, Veterans and Military Affairs Committee killed SB-1036, which would have provided relief to businesses for the onerous business personal property tax that they pay.

The CACI Tax Council, chaired by Rhonda Sparlin, Partner, RubinBrown, and Member of the CACI Board of Directors, voted on January 19th to support the bill.  CACI has been a decades-long advocate for lightening or eliminating the burden that the tax places on businesses, especially capital-intensive businesses.

Following is the legislative summary of the bill:

HB-1036  “Reduce Business Personal Property Taxes”

There is currently an exemption from property tax for business personal property that would otherwise be listed on a single personal property schedule that is equal to $7,400 for the current property tax year cycle. The bill raises the exemption to $50,000 commencing in tax year 2018, and continues to adjust it for inflation for subsequent property tax cycles, so that businesses with personal property under $50,000, or the inflation adjusted amount, would not have to file the business personal property tax forms nor pay the corresponding tax.

The bill also raises the value of business personal property that qualifies for an exemption for consumable property from $350, which is the value set by the property tax administrator, to $500.

The bill’s Fiscal Note provided this analysis:

Summary of Legislation

This bill increases the exemption for business personal property from $7,400 to $50,000 in 2018 and adjusts the exemption for inflation every two years.  In addition, the bill raises the limit for consumable property that is exempt from property taxes from $350 to $500.

Background

Current law exemption.  Business owners are required to report how much personal property they own in a county to the county assessor if they own more than $7,400 in property in the county.  Businesses with less than the $7,400 threshold of personal property within a county are not required to report the value to the assessor and it is not taxed.  If a business owns more than $7,400 in personal property in a county, the entire amount is taxed.  The $50,000 exemption under this bill would be administered exactly like the $7,400 exemption in current law.

Property taxes.  Personal property is assessed at 29 percent of its actual value.  For example, the taxable value of personal property with an actual value of $100,000 is $29,000. Property tax is collected by various local taxing entities, including municipalities, counties, school districts, and special districts.  Each local taxing entity establishes a mill rate that is multiplied by the taxable value of all taxable property within the jurisdiction.  One mill generates $1.00 for each $1,000 of assessed value.  Property taxes are collected in arrears, in the first half of the calendar year following the property tax year.  For example, 2018 property taxes will be collected in the first half of 2019.

Consumable property.  Consumable property and office supplies are exempt from property taxes.  Through administrative rule, the Division of Property Taxation has determined that this exemption applies to property with an economic life of less than one year or any property with an installed cost of less than $350.  This bill increases the threshold to $500.

The bill was sponsored by Representative Timothy Leonard (R-Evergreen).

For information about HB-1036 or related tax issues, contact Loren Furman, CACI Senior Vice President, Federal and State Relations, at 303.866.9642.

For news media coverage of this bill, read:

Effort to cut business personal property tax dies in Legislature,” by Ed Sealover, The Denver Business Journal, February 1st.


Bill Affirming Court Ruling that Public Safety and Environment Supersede Oil-and-Gas Production Jumps First House Hurdle

Yesterday afternoon, the 13-member House Health, Insurance and Environment Committee approved the bill, HB-1071, on a party-line, 7-to-6 vote.

HB-1071 is sponsored by Representative Joe Salazar (D-Thornton).

On Wednesday, the CACI Energy and Environment Council voted to oppose the measure.

Next stop for the bill is the House Floor for Second Reading.

Here’s the legislative summary of the bill:

HB-1071  “Concerning the regulation of oil and gas operations in a manner consistent with the protection of public safety.”

Current law declares that it is in the public interest to ‘[f]oster the responsible, balanced development, production, and utilization of the natural resources of oil and gas in the state of Colorado in a manner consistent with protection of public health, safety, and welfare, including protection of the environment and wildlife resources’. The Colorado court of appeals, in Martinez v. Colo. Oil & Gas Conservation Comm’n , 2017 COA 37, has construed this language to mean that oil and gas development is not balanced with the protection of public health, safety, and welfare, including protection of the environment and wildlife resources. Rather, that development must occur in a manner consistent with such protection.

The bill codifies the result reached in Martinez .

On Monday, the Colorado Supreme Court announced that it will hear the Martinez case.

The bill’s Fiscal Note provides the following analysis of the legislation:

Summary of Legislation

This bill clarifies that the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) in the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) is required to regulate oil and gas operations in a manner consistent with the protection of public health, safety, and welfare, including the protection of the environment and wildlife resources.  The commission must regulate oil and gas operations so as to prevent and mitigate adverse environmental or public health impacts.

Background

Under current law the COGCC is charged with regulating oil and gas resource production in the state in a way that balances production and public health, safety, and welfare.  In 2013, a rule was proposed requiring that the commission withhold drilling permits unless it could be independently confirmed that the drilling would not adversely impact human health or the environment.  The commission concluded that the proposed rule would readjust the balance between production and public safety, and that the proposed rule would require regulatory actions that are beyond the commission’s statutory authority.  In 2014, the district court upheld the commission’s decision to deny adopting the proposed rule.

The Colorado court of appeals, in Martinez v. Colorado Oil & Gas Conservation Commission 16CA0564 (Colorado 2017), overturned the district court’s decision.  The court of appeals concluded that current regulation is not balanced between production and public health and safety, and that current law gives the commission the authority and obligation to regulate oil and gas development in the interest of public health and the environment.  This bill codifies the result reached in Martinez.

Under a limited set of circumstances, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) consults with the commission on surface location permit applications.  In general, CDPHE staff evaluate the permit application, conduct a site visit, review public comments, confer with staff from air, water and solid waste divisions, and with commission staff.  Currently, the CDPHE consults on about 12 applications annually.

For news media coverage of this issue and HB-1071, read:

Colorado Legislative fight over oil and gas begins anew, with predictable end,” by Joey Bunch, ColoradoPolitics, February 2nd.

Oil and gas bill would make controversial court ruling state policy,” by Cathy Proctor, The Denver Business Journal, February 1st.

For more information about HB-1071, contact Bill Skewes, CACI Contract Lobbyist.


CACI’s Energy and Environment Council Opposes Bill to Eliminate Tax Credits for “Innovative” Vehicles

At its first meeting for the 2018 legislative session on Wednesday, the CACI Energy and Environment Council, chaired by John Jacus, Partner, Davis Graham & Stubbs, voted to oppose SB-47.

Here’s the legislative summary of the bill:

SB-47 “Repeal Tax Credits Innovative Vehicles”

The bill repeals the income tax credits for innovative motor vehicles and innovative trucks for purchase and leases entered into on or after January 1, 2019.

For the 2018-19 state fiscal year and each fiscal year thereafter through the 2020-21 state fiscal year, the bill requires the state controller to credit an amount of tax revenue estimated to be retained by the repeal of the income tax credits to the highway users tax fund.

The bill is sponsored by Senator Vicki Marble (R-Fort Collins).

The bill’s Fiscal Note has not yet been released.  The bill is scheduled for its first hearing next Tuesday, February 6th, before the Senate Finance Committee after it convenes for a session at 2 p.m. in Senate Committee Room 357.

“Innovative vehicles” include those powered by electricity, compressed natural gas and propane, for instance.  Consequently, CACI members with truck and automobile fleets powered by such non-traditional power sources would be severely affected should SB-47 become law.

For more information about SB-47, contact Bill Skewes, CACI Contract Lobbyist.


Bill to Eliminate Fossil Fuels Use by Utilities by 2035 Evaporates in Senate Committee

A bill to require 100 percent renewable energy production under the state’s renewable energy standard by utilities in Colorado by 2035–thus eliminating fossil fuel use by the utilities–died yesterday afternoon in the Senate Agriculture, Natural Resources and Energy Committee on a party-line, six-to-five vote.

On Wednesday, the CACI Energy and Environment Council agreed to oppose SB-64.

The bill would have applied to investor-owned utilities, municipal utilities and cooperative electric associations.

The bill’s prime sponsor was Democrat Senator Matt Jones (Louisville), who is term-limited and running for a seat on the Boulder County Commission.

Here’s the legislative summary of the bill:

SB-64  “Require 100% Renewable Energy By 2035”

The bill updates the renewable energy standard to require that all electric utilities, including cooperative electric associations and municipally owned utilities, derive their energy from 100% renewable sources by 2035. The bill also:

  • Removes recycled energy from the types of energy sources eligible for meeting the renewable energy standard;
  • Allows a utility to obtain energy efficiency credits equal in value to renewable energy credits based on any energy efficiency upgrades made for a low-income residential customer;
  • Removes multipliers used for counting certain renewable energy generated; and
  • Phases out the system of tradable renewable energy credits so that renewable energy generated after 2035 is not eligible for renewable energy credits.

The bill’s Fiscal Note provided the following detailed analysis and history of Colorado’s renewable  energy standard:

Summary of Legislation

This bill modifies the state’s renewable energy standard (RES) to require that all investor-owned utilities (IOUs), cooperative electric associations (CEAs), and municipally-owned utilities (MOUs) generate 100 percent of their electricity from eligible renewable resources by 2035. The bill also removes recycled energy sources from the types of energy eligible for meeting the RES.

Increases total and distributed generation RES requirements for IOUs.  The bill boosts the required RES percentages for IOUs in order to achieve 100 percent renewable generation by 2035, according to the following schedule.

Calendar yearsProposed
2020 to 202930 percent
2030 to 203470 percent
2035 and beyond100percent

The bill also requires distributed generation to equal at least 7 percent of retail electricity sales after 2020.

Increases RES requirements for both CEAs and MOUs.  Under current law, qualifying CEAs and MOUs are required to generate 20 percent and 10 percent of their electricity, respectively, from renewable resources beginning in 2020. This bill increases the required RES percentages for MOUs beginning in 2020 and for CEAs beginning in 2025 in order to achieve 100 percent renewable generation by 2040, according to the following schedule:

Calendar years                        Proposed

2020 to 2024 (MOUs only)     20 percent

2025 to 2029                           40 percent

2030 to 2034                           70 percent

2035 and beyond                     100 percent

Increases RES requirements for MOUs that qualify after 2006.  Under current law, MOUs that qualify for the RES after 2006, must generate specified percentages of their retail sales from renewable energy.  These percentages increase up to a maximum of 10 percent through the first 13 years of qualification.  This bill extends the phase-in period according to the following schedule:

  • 20 percent in years 17 through 20; •   40 percent in years 21 through 24;
  • 60 percent in years 25 through 28; •   80 percent in years 29 through 32; and
  • 100 percent in years 33 and beyond.

 

Declining value of Renewable Energy Credits (RECs).  Under current law, qualifying utilities may purchase RECs in order to meet their obligation under the RES.  This bill phases out the system of tradeable renewable energy credits so that renewable energy generated after 2035 is not eligible for renewable energy credits.

The bill allows a utility to obtain energy efficiency credits based on any energy efficiency upgrades made for a low-income residential customer.  Finally, the bill removes multipliers used for counting the generation of certain types of renewable energy.

Background

Previous legislation.  Since the passage of Amendment 37 in the 2004 general election, the General Assembly has passed several pieces of legislation related to clean energy development in Colorado.  To provide context, the following describes three bills that have been enacted modifying Section 40-2-124, C.R.S., the statutory section established by Amendment 37.

House Bill 07-1281 expanded the definitions of a “qualifying retail utility” to include all utilities, except MOUs serving less than 40,000 customers.  The bill raised the standard for renewable electricity generation for IOUs from 2008 through 2019 and set the standard at 20 percent beginning in 2020.  The bill also established a new standard for renewable electricity generation for REAs and MOUs serving over 40,000 customers, requiring increasing renewable generation from 2008 to 2019 and establishing a 10 percent standard beginning in 2020.  The bill expanded eligible sources to include recycled energy, and increased the allowable retail rate impact from one to two percent of the total electric bill for each retail customer.

House Bill 10-1001 further raised the standard for renewable electricity generation for IOUs for 2011 through 2019 and set the standard at 30 percent beginning in 2020.  The bill also established increasing requirements for distributed generation according to the following schedule; 1 percent for 2011 and 2012; 1.25 percent for 2013 and 2014; 1.75 percent for 2015 and 2016; 2 percent for 2017 through 2019; and 3 percent for 2020 and beyond.

Senate Bill 13-252 raised the standard for renewable electricity generation for CEAs serving over 100,000 customers and for generation and transmission associations providing wholesale electricity to CEAs from 10 to 20 percent beginning in 2020.  In addition, the bill raised the allowable retail rate impact for CEAs from 1 to 2 percent.

Electric Resource Planning process.  Pursuant to the Colorado Public Utility Commission’s (PUC’s) Electric Resource Planning Rules, 4 CCR 723-3-3600, et seq., Colorado’s two IOUs are required to file an electric resource plan (ERP) with the PUC once every four years. The resource planning process typically involves two phases.  The ERP includes development of a load forecast, evaluation of the utility’s current resources, determination of need for additional resources, and the utility’s proposed plan for acquiring the resources to meet the identified need. The ERP covers a 7-year resource acquisition period and a 25-year planning period, as required by the ERP rules.  Currently, the PUC is evaluating 2016 ERPs, which cover an acquisition period to 2023 and a planning period to 2041.  The 2020 ERP planning cycle will begin in begin in October 2019.

For more information about SB-64, contact Bill Skewes, CACI Contract Lobbyist.


Senate Committee Torpedoes Bill to Hamstring Oil-and-Gas Industry for Reclamation Costs

Yesterday afternoon, the Senate Agriculture, Natural Resources and Energy Committee killed SB-63 on a party-line six-to-five vote.

On Wednesday, the CACI Energy and Environment Council agreed to oppose the SB-63.

The bill’s prime sponsor was Democrat Senator Matt Jones (Louisville)Senator Jones, who is term-limited, is running for a seat on the Boulder County Commission.

Here’s how The Boulder Daily Camera described Senator Jones, who is running against Lafayette Mayor Christine Berg for the seat:

Both Berg and Jones have emerged in ardent opposition to fracking activity around the county in recent years — Jones at the state level, and Berg within east Boulder County.

Jones was a sponsor of two recent state bills involving oil and gas development, including forced pooling and oil well setbacks from schools.

Berg, also a Democrat, was an overseer of Lafayette’s Climate Bill of Rights and Protections measure, which sought to legalize civil disobedience and direct action protests in the face of oil and gas development.

“I think that Boulder County has a responsibility to lead on clean energy, and on pushing back on fossil fuels and oil and gas development,” Jones said Wednesday. “You do everything you can to make them accountable, you have strong rules and have staff keep track of them.”

Here’s the legislative summary of the introduced bill:

SB-63 “Oil Gas Higher Financial Assurance Reclamation Requirements”

Section 2 of the bill prohibits the Colorado oil and gas conservation commission from accepting any of the available types of financial assurance unless the operator demonstrates, by clear and convincing evidence, that the financial assurance will be sufficient to finance all reasonably foreseeable expenses related to ensuring compliance with the oil and gas law if the operator fails to meet its compliance obligations. The commission shall calculate the total financial assurance required by multiplying the number of oil and gas facilities subject to the application by the projected cost to finance every reasonably foreseeable eventuality related to ensuring compliance with regard to each type of facility.

Section 4 adds reclamation requirements that are adapted from the reclamation requirements applicable to hard rock mines.

The bill’s Fiscal Note provides the following analysis:

Summary of Legislation

The bill requires an oil and gas operator to provide financial assurance to the state that it is capable of fulfilling every obligation of the Oil and Gas Conservation Act.  The Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) in the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) must conduct an up-front financial viability analysis of an operator, and may only accept an assurance that clearly demonstrates the ability to finance every reasonably foreseeable eventuality related to compliance.  The COGCC must set a fee by rule to recover the commission’s cost to conduct the up-front financial viability analysis.

Every operator that applies for a permit or permit amendment must submit and execute a proposed reclamation plan on all affected land.  The bill sets general requirements for the reclamation plan and its implementation, which must conform to the affected land’s intended post production uses.  The COGCC must approve the reclamation plans after conferring with county commissioners and, if applicable, supervisors of a conservation district that contains the land.

On the yearly anniversary of the permit date, operators must submit a report and map to the COGCC showing existing disturbances, reclamation accomplished to date and during the preceding year, and new disturbances and planned reclamation for the upcoming year.

Background

Under current law, oil and gas operators are required to provide financial surety (bond or other mechanism) for the eventual plugging of an oil and gas well.  A portion of the oil and gas conservation levy is used to fund the plugging and reclamation of wells for which no operator can be found, or to supplement the available bond.  These wells are referred to as “orphan” wells.

The orphaned wells program administered by the COGCC is responsible for ensuring that orphaned oil and gas sites are properly plugged, reclaimed, and abandoned in accordance with commission rules. The program is funded by an appropriation of $445,000 from the Oil and Gas Conservation and Environmental Respond Fund, which primarily consists of revenue from the oil and gas conservation levy.

Based on the COGCC’s current financial assurance requirements, the cost of reclamation can exceed the amount in bonding required by an operator.  Oil and gas operators are required to post an individual bond of $10,000 for a shallow well, and $20,0000 for a deep well.  Operators may also post a blanket bond of $60,000 for up to 100 wells, or $100,000 bond for 100 or more wells.

For more information about SB-63, contact Bill Skewes, CACI Contract Lobbyist.


Gov. Hickenlooper appoints new Executive Director to Department of Labor and Employment

Today, the Governor appointed Sam Walker as the new Executive Director of the Colorado Department of Labor and Employment.  “Sam brings a lifetime passion to help those who have been left behind in education or training,” said Governor John Hickenlooper.  Walker was most recently the Chief Legal and Corporate Affairs Officer, and previously Chief Human Resources Officer at Molson Coors Brewing Company.  Prior to joining Molson Coors, he was a partner at Wiley Rein LLP, in Washington, D.C.  Prior to that role, he served in the U.S. Departments of Education and Labor.  Sam Walker’s appointment is pending confirmation by the State Senate.


CACI's Legislative Agenda

Below is a list of bills and their status on which CACI Policy Councils have taken positions. For more information on the bills, contact Loren Furman, CACI Senior Vice President, State and Federal Relations, at 303.866.9642.

Health Care Council BillsBill Title/DescriptionCouncil Position
HB 1007 by Rep. Kennedy & Sen. LambertSubstance Use Disorder Payment & CoverageMonitor/Passed
HB 1009 by Rep. Roberts & Sen. DonovanDiabetes Drug Pricing Transparency Act 2018Oppose/Dead
HB 1097 by Reps. Catlin, Danielson & Sens. Coram, ToddPatient Choice Of PharmacyOppose/Dead
HB 1279 by Rep. Esgar & Sens. Priola, MorenoElectronic Prescribing Controlled SubstancesSupport/Dead
HB 1311 by Reps. Rankin, HamnerSingle Geographic Rating Area Individual Health PlanOppose/Dead
HB 1358 by Reps. Foote, Beckman & Sens. Lundberg, AguilarHealth Care Charges Billing Required DisclosuresOppose/Dead
HB 1370 by Reps. Esgar, Singer & Sen. JahnDrug Coverage Health PlanOppose as Introduced/Dead
HB 1392 by Reps. Kennedy, Rankin & Sens. Coram, DonovanState Innovation Waiver Reinsurance ProgramOppose/Dead
SB 136 by Neville & Reps. Kraft-Tharp, SiasHealth Insurance Producer Fees And Fee DisclosureSupport/Signed by Governor
SB 023 by Sen. Martinez Humenik & Rep. GinalPromote Off-label Use Pharmaceutical ProductsOppose/Dead

 

Tax Council BillsBill Title/DescriptionCouncil Position
HB 1022 by Reps. Sias, Kraft-Tharp & Sen. Jahn,Requiring DOR to do RFI for Sales Tax Simplification SystemSupport/Signed by Governor
HB 1185 by Reps. Kraft-Tharp, Wist & Sens. Neville, MorenoMarket Sourcing For Business Income Tax ApportionmentSupport/Passed
HB 1036 by Rep. Leonard & Sen. NevilleReduction of Business Personal Property TaxSupport/Dead
HB 1201 by Rep. Thurlow & Sen. CoramSeverance Tax Voter-Approved Revenue ChangeSupport w/ Amendment/Dead
HB 1387 by Rep. Rankin & Sen. MorenoEliminate Oil & Gas Abatement Refund InterestOppose/Dead

 

Labor & Employment
Council Bills
Bill Title/DescriptionCouncil Position
HB 1001 by Reps. Winter, Gray & Sens.
Fields, Donovan
Family and Medical Leave Insurance ProgramOppose/Dead
HB 1033 by Rep. Weissman & Sen. CoramEmployee Leave To Participate In ElectionsNeutral/Dead
HB 1067 by Reps. Melton, SalazarRight To Rest ActOppose/Dead
HB 1128 by Reps. Wist, Bridges & Sens. Lambert, CourtProtections For Consumer Data PrivacyNeutral as Amended
HB 1250 by Reps.Kraft-Tharp, Sias & Sen. PriolaAnalysis to Improve Compliance With Rules By BusinessSupport/Passed
HB 1256 by Reps. Duran, Herod & Sen. GardnerSunset Continue Civil Rights Division And CommissionSupport as Amended
HB 1261 by Rep. WeissmanColorado Arbitration Fairness ActOppose/Dead
HB 1262 by Reps. Jackson & RobertsArbitrations Services Provider Transparency ActOppose/Dead
HB 1298 by Reps. Pettersen, Bridges & Sens. Donovan, ToddColorado Secure Savings PlanOppose/Dead
HB 1368 by Reps. Danielson, Melton & Sens. Merrifield, MorenoLocal Control Of Minimum WageOppose/Dead
HB 1377 by Reps. Coleman, PettersenProhibit Seeking Salary InformationOppose/Dead
HB 1378 by Reps. Danielson, Buckner & Sens. Donovan, FieldsEqual Pay For Equal Work ActOppose/Dead
SB 44 by Sen. Crowder & Rep. LandgrafVeterans Employment Preference By Private EmployerNeutral/Dead
SB 178 by Sen. Smallwood & Rep. Kraft-TharpSimilar Coverage Independent Commercial VehiclesSupport/Passed
SB 193 by Sen. CoramLimit State Agency Occupational RegulationsOppose/Dead

 

Energy & Environment
Council Bills
Bill Title/DescriptionCouncil Position
HB 1071 by Rep. SalazarRegulate Oil Gas Operations Protect Public SafetyOppose/Dead
HB 1157 by Reps. Becker, SingerIncreased Reporting Oil And Gas Incidents

Oppose/Dead
HB 1215 by Rep. ArndtSafe Disposal Naturally Occur Radioactive MaterialOppose As Introduced/Dead
HB 1271 by Reps. Gray, Willett & Sen. TateUC Electric Utilities Economic Development RatesSupport/Passed
HB 1274 by Reps. Becker, Bridges & Sen. KerrReduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions by 2050Oppose/Dead
HB 1289 by Reps. Foote, Young & Sen. JonesExempt Local Gov’t School Districts Statutory PoolingOppose/Dead
HB 1297 by Reps. Winter, Pettersen & Sen. DonovanClimate Change Preparedness & ResiliencyOppose/Dead
HB 1301 by Reps. Roberts, McLachlanProtect Water Quality Adverse Mining ImpactsOppose/Dead
HB 1352 by Reps. Foote, Gray & Sens. Jones, AguilarOil And Gas Facilities Distance From School PropertyOppose/Dead
HB 1400 by Reps. Becker, McKean & Sens. Scott, JahnIncrease Fees Stationary Sources Air PollutantsSupport/Passed
HB 1419 by Reps. Foote, Jackson & Sens.Jones, KefalasOil Gas Operators Disclosures Wellhead IntegrityOppose/Dewad
SB 009 by Sens. Priola, FenbergAllow Electric Utility Customers Energy Storage EquipmentNeutral/Signed by Governor
SB 047 by Sen. Marble & Rep. SaineRepeal Tax Credits Innovative VehiclesOppose/Dead
SB 063 by Sen. Jones & Rep. BenavidezOil Gas Higher Financial Assurance Reclamation RequirementsOppose/Dead
SB 064 by Sen. Jones & Rep. FooteRequire 100% Renewable Energy By 2035Oppose/Dead
SB 167 by Sens. Scott, Donovan & Reps. Winter, Saine Enforce Requirements 811 Locate Underground FacilitiesNeutral/Passed
SB 230 by Sen. Marble & Rep. SaineModify Laws Drilling Units Pooling OrdersSupport/Passed
SB 245 by Sen. CookeAllow Natural Occurring Radioactive Material RulesSupport/Passed

 

Governmental Affairs
Council Bills
Bill Title/DescriptionCouncil Position
SB 062 by Sen. MorenoSnow Removal Service Liability LimitationOppose/Passed
SB 230 by Sen. Marble & Rep. SaineModify Laws Drilling Units Pooling OrdersSupport/Passed
HB 1392 by Reps. Kennedy, Rankin & Sens. Coram, DonovanState Innovation Waiver Reinsurance ProgramOppose/Dead
HB 1128 by Reps. Wist, Bridges & Sens. Court, LambertProtections For Consumer Data PrivacySupport as Amended
SCR 004 by Sens.Grantham, FenbergCongressional RedistrictingSupport/Passed
SCR 005 by Sens.Grantham, FenbergLegislative RedistrictingSupport/Passed

 

General Business Issues BillsBill Title/DescriptionCouncil Position
SB 001 by Sens. Cooke, Baumgardner & Reps Carver, BuckTransportation Infrastructure FundingSupport/Passed